The Next Chapter

Crossposted at Jenster's Musings

The-Next-Chapter-1-470x264

 

I am staring at a new chapter of the cancer chronicles. It’s not a bad chapter, precisely, but it has me feeling a little uncomfortable. Or maybe restless. Or maybe I just don’t know what it is I’m feeling.

Next week I see my oncologist for my last biannual appointment. That is a great thing. I am nearly 8 years out from diagnosis and over 7 years since my first No Evidence of Disease report. That is a survivor’s dream.

There are only a few days left of my Arimidex and I won’t be refilling the prescription. Two years of Tamoxifen followed by five years of Arimidex and I’m finally done. The original plan was to be on post-chemo drugs for a total of five years, but somewhere around year four a study indicated that it was best to stay on the Arimidex for five years regardless of how long Tamoxifen had been taken. That was a huge disappointment at the time (worthy of a few tears), but the extra two years are done and I can finally stop the Arimidex.

Earlier this evening I was reading stories from women who had gotten off the Arimidex and how their lives were improved. More energy, weight loss, decreased stiffness and pain, slight reversal of some menopausal symptoms… all things that I deal with to some extent. I want to be excited about the prospect of a better quality of life, but I’m afraid to. I am 47, after all. I’m not supposed to have as much energy, weight loss is supposed to be more difficult, stiffness and pain are just a part of growing older and menopausal symptoms are what you get when you’ve had your ovaries removed, right?

So what if I don’t notice any difference in any of those areas after I stop the medication? What if all my “symptoms” are just a result of my age? I can tell you right now that if there is no improvement I will be just short of devastated. And incredibly furious. Again. The injustice of cancer has a way of causing righteous anger even still.

I was talking with two of my co-workers today and I told them that I don’t want to be a “new” me. I just want to be the old me. The me that I was at 39. Or more specifically, the me that I would be today if I hadn’t been derailed by the monster. Of course, I have no idea what that me would be. I just know it wouldn’t be the me I am. But maybe I’ll be much closer to that me after I stop the Arimidex. I guess time will tell.

There’s more to this chapter than this, though, and it goes beyond my own personal battle. This afternoon I started the process to get Katie genetically tested. When she was about 13 my oncologist told me that I would want her to be screened when she was 18 because some of her life choices would depend on whether or not she was genetically disposed to breast cancer. At the time 18 seemed so far away.

It hurts my heart that I’ve done this to her and Taylor. We don’t even know if this is genetic, but just the fact that Katie (and possibly Taylor) has to go through the testing is more than I think either of them should have to go through. I feel responsible and guilty and I’ve never been one to feel guilt over much of anything. But this? I want to heap burning coals upon my head. Even though I know it’s not my fault. And yet…

I know I’ve said this time and time again over the past 7 years, but I really thought once I was through with treatment and reconstruction everything would be normal again. What I have found is that cancer has a ripple effect and I will never be completely free from it. And sometimes that’s exhausting.

But then I remind myself that I don’t have cancer and I am healthy, quirky aging and/or side-effects aside. Even more important is that my children don’t have cancer and they are healthy. I have a husband who adores me, kids who love me, great family and friends and I am happy.

So next week I’ll go see the White Russian and he’ll say how great I’m doing and he’ll send me for a dexascan to see where my osteopenia is (that will hopefully eventually be reversed since I’m stopping the Arimidex) and then he’ll tell me that I don’t need to come back for another year (which will make me happy and sad all at the same time). And sometime soon Katie will go get tested to see if she has the BRCA gene (which I don’t think she does) and she can then make the educated choices that a young woman needs to make.

And then I can move on to the next chapter.

About these ads

2 Responses to The Next Chapter

  1. mommydoctor says:

    I’m a 22-yr survivor whose children were 1, 3 and 5 when I was diagnosed. I’ve been in and out of treatment since (currently out).

    Please keep in mind that you are experiencing a milestone transition. One mantra that helps me is “TRANSITIONS ARE TRYING.” Especially when the transition is something wonderful that I looked forward to and worked hard for, this mantra reminds me that it is normal to feel unpleasant emotions related to grief and anxiety.

    You wrote of “the injustice of cancer.” It has helped me to keep in mind that illness has nothing to do with justice, just as colors have nothing to do with pounds and ounces.

    I sympathize with your emotional reaction to genetic testing. Because of a strong FH of breast cancer, I underwent genetic testing. In an article for oncology professionals, I wrote about my sense of “Testing my Children” when they drew my blood. You can read it here: http://tinyurl.com/ot092509

    I hope this is helpful in some way.
    Life is good.

    with hope, Wendy

  2. Jen,

    I will be interested in seeing how many of the side effects go away after you stop the Arimidex. I am on Aromasin… my doctor asks me how the side effects are and I say that I am not sure what is attributed to the Aromasin or menopause or aging. I went from chemopause to having my ovaries removed to taking the Aromasin so I just don’t know what side effects are from what cause.

    I so understand about wanting the “old me”…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 797 other followers

%d bloggers like this: